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This content will become publicly available on June 26, 2022

Title: Toward Practical Computing Competencies
Competency-based learning has been a successful pedagogical approach for centuries, but only recently has it gained traction within computing education. Building on recent developments in the field, this working group will explore competency-based learning from practical considerations and show how it benefits computing. In particular, the group will identify existing computing competencies and provide a pathway to generate competencies usable in the field. The working group will also investigate appropriate assessment approaches, provide guidelines for evaluating student attainment, and show how accrediting agencies can use these techniques to assess the level of competence reflected in their standards and criteria. Recommendations from the working group report are intended to help practical computing education writ large.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1922169
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10259951
Journal Name:
26th ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education V. 2 (ITiCSE 2021)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
603 to 604
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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