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Title: How youth-staff relationships and program activities promote Latinx adolescent outcomes in a university-community afterschool math enrichment activity
outh-staff relationships and program activities are important elements in designing high- quality afterschool activities that promote a broad range of outcomes. Using a qualitative approach, Latinx adolescents were interviewed (n 1⁄4 28, 50% girls) about their experiences in a university-based afterschool math enrichment activity. Findings under the first goal of the study suggest that Latinx adolescents perceived changes in their math-specific outcomes (e.g., problem-solving skills), future science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) pathways (e.g., envisioning a future career), and social-emotional skills (e.g., relation- ship skills) as a result of participating in the activity. Under the second goal of the study, findings identified the specific practices that adolescents thought promoted those out- comes, including incorporating advanced math concepts and engaging in collaborative learning, engaging in campus tours and informal conversations, and using culturally respon- sive practices. The findings from this study can be leveraged by scholars and educators to design, further strengthen, and evaluate high-quality afterschool activities.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1809208
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10271694
Journal Name:
Applied Developmental Science
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 19
ISSN:
1088-8691
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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