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Title: Reinterpretation of LHC Results for New Physics: Status and recommendations after Run 2
We report on the status of efforts to improve the reinterpretation of searches and measurements at the LHC in terms of models for new physics, in the context of the LHC Reinterpretation Forum. We detail current experimental offerings in direct searches for new particles, measurements, technical implementations and Open Data, and provide a set of recommendations for further improving the presentation of LHC results in order to better enable reinterpretation in the future. We also provide a brief description of existing software reinterpretation frameworks and recent global analyses of new physics that make use of the current data.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1914731
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10273135
Journal Name:
SciPost Physics
Volume:
9
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2542-4653
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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