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Title: Improving Grasp Classification through Spatial Metrics Available from Sensors
We present a method for classifying the quality of near-contact grasps using spatial metrics that are recoverable from sensor data. Current methods often rely on calculating precise contact points, which are difficult to calculate in real life, or on tactile sensors or image data, which may be unavailable for some applications. Our method, in contrast, uses a mix of spatial metrics that do not depend on the fingers being in contact with the object, such as the object's approximate size and location. The grasp quality can be calculated {\em before} the fingers actually contact the object, enabling near-grasp quality prediction. Using a random forest classifier, the resulting system is able to predict grasp quality with 96\% accuracy using spatial metrics based on the locations of the robot palm, fingers and object. Furthermore, it can maintain an accuracy of 90\% when exposed to 10\% noise across all its inputs.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1911050
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10275405
Journal Name:
IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
ISSN:
1049-3492
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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