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Title: The bursty origin of the Milky Way thick disc
ABSTRACT We investigate thin and thick stellar disc formation in Milky Way-mass galaxies using 12 FIRE-2 cosmological zoom-in simulations. All simulated galaxies experience an early period of bursty star formation that transitions to a late-time steady phase of near-constant star formation. Stars formed during the late-time steady phase have more circular orbits and thin-disc-like morphology at z = 0, while stars born during the bursty phase have more radial orbits and thick-disc structure. The median age of thick-disc stars at z = 0 correlates strongly with this transition time. We also find that galaxies with an earlier transition from bursty to steady star formation have a higher thin-disc fractions at z = 0. Three of our systems have minor mergers with Large Magellanic Cloud-size satellites during the thin-disc phase. These mergers trigger short starbursts but do not destroy the thin disc nor alter broad trends between the star formation transition time and thin/thick-disc properties. If our simulations are representative of the Universe, then stellar archaeological studies of the Milky Way (or M31) provide a window into past star formation modes in the Galaxy. Current age estimates of the Galactic thick disc would suggest that the Milky Way transitioned from bursty to steady phase more » ∼6.5 Gyr ago; prior to that time the Milky Way likely lacked a recognizable thin disc. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1715216 1910965 1715101 2108318 1911233
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10278875
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
505
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
889 to 902
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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