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Title: Dynamically produced moving groups in interacting simulations
ABSTRACT We show that smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of dwarf galaxies interacting with a Milky Way-like disc produce moving groups in the simulated stellar disc. We analyse three different simulations: one that includes dwarf galaxies that mimic the Large Magellanic Cloud, Small Magellanic Cloud, and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal; another with a dwarf galaxy that orbits nearly in the plane of the Milky Way disc; and a null case that does not include a dwarf galaxy interaction. We present a new algorithm to find large moving groups in the VR, Vϕ plane in an automated fashion that allows us to compare velocity substructure in different simulations, at different locations, and at different times. We find that there are significantly more moving groups formed in the interacting simulations than in the isolated simulation. A number of dwarf galaxies are known to orbit the Milky Way, with at least one known to have had a close pericentre approach. Our analysis of simulations here indicates that dwarf galaxies like those orbiting our Galaxy produce large moving groups in the disc. Our analysis also suggests that some of the moving groups in the Milky Way may have formed due to dynamical interactions with perturbing dwarf satellites. The groups identified in the simulations by our algorithm have similar properties to those found in the Milky Way, including similar fractions of the total stellar population included in the groups, as well as similar average velocities and velocity dispersions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2009574 1908653
NSF-PAR ID:
10282203
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
505
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0035-8711
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2561 to 2574
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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