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Title: Uncovering the Promises and Challenges of Social Media Use in the Low-Wage Labor Market: Insights from Employers
Social media has become an effective recruitment tool for higher-waged and white-collar professionals. Yet, past studies have questioned its effectiveness for the recruitment of lower-waged workers. It is also unclear whether or how employers leverage social media in their recruitment of low-wage job seekers, and how social media could better support the needs of both stakeholders. Therefore, we conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with employers of low-wage workers in the U.S. We found that employers: use social media, primarily Facebook, to access large pools of active low-wage job seekers; and recognize indirect signals about low-wage job seekers’ commitment and job readiness. Our work suggests that there remains a visible, yet unaddressed power imbalance between low-wage workers and employers in the use of social media, which risks further destabilizing the precarious labor market.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1717186 1901171
NSF-PAR ID:
10283349
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2021 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 13
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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