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Title: Augmented Reality in Science Laboratories: Investigating High School Students’ Navigation Patterns and Their Effects on Learning Performance
Augmented reality (AR) has the potential to fundamentally transform science education by making learning of abstract science ideas tangible and engaging. However, little is known about how students interacted with AR technologies and how these interactions may affect learning performance in science laboratories. This study examined high school students’ navigation patterns and science learning with a mobile AR technology, developed by the research team, in laboratory settings. The AR technology allows students to conduct hands-on laboratory experiments and interactively explore various science phenomena covering biology, chemistry, and physics concepts. In this study, seventy ninth-grade students carried out science laboratory experiments in pairs to learn thermodynamics. Our cluster analysis identified two groups of students, which differed significantly in navigation length and breadth. The two groups demonstrated unique navigation patterns that revealed students’ various ways of observing, describing, exploring, and evaluating science phenomena. These navigation patterns were associated with learning performance as measured by scores on lab reports. The results suggested the need for providing access to multiple representations and different types of interactions with these representations to support effective science learning as well as designing representations and connections between representations to cultivate scientific reasoning skills and nuanced understanding of scientific processes.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2054079 1712676
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284428
Journal Name:
Journal of Educational Computing Research
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
073563312110387
ISSN:
0735-6331
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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