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Title: Chemistry and Transportation Engineering Experiment-Centric Pedagogy with Hands-on Labs
Abstract This project developed small, portable sensor-based experiments as an alternative to those conducted in a traditional laboratory setting. Experiment-centric pedagogy was used in this study and hands-on laboratory experiments were developed using USB-based measurement devices (ADALM 1000) and ADALM2000). Three experiments were developed for Chemistry namely pH meter, thermochemistry, and spectrophotometry. During pH settlement, the voltage was recorded, and the calibration curve drawn using standard buffers 4, 7, and 10. Furthermore, thermochemistry results were performed and validated using a digital thermometer. R2 curves have been found to yield good results for both experiments. Department of Transportation worked on four experiments which include vehicle counter, accelerometer, decibel meter, and a soil moisture meter. Data was recorded from each setup. Since the sensors provided results as voltages, a transfer function equation was used to convert the reading to the required unit of expression to validate the results from the USB device. These experiments were developed by pairing a graduate student in electrical engineering with a student in another discipline during a 10-week summer workshop. Student trainees underwent different training sessions that comprise of developing and testing instruments for measurement, attending the ASEE virtual conference, and research workshops. Students also read and summarized more » articles on the use of experimental pedagogy to motivate students. This study is designed to improve outcomes for students in the chemistry and transportation departments using laboratory activities. Keyword: Chemistry, Transportation, Sensor, Active Learning, ADALM Board, and Experiment Centric Pedagogy « less
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1915614
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10287103
Journal Name:
2020 Fall ASEE Mid-Atlantic Section Meeting
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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