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Title: Verifying Fundamental Solution Groups for Lossless Wave Equations via Stationary Action and Optimal Control
A new optimal control based representation for stationary action trajectories is constructed by exploiting connections between semiconvexity, semiconcavity, and stationarity. This new representation is used to verify a known two-point boundary value problem characterization of stationary action.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1908918
NSF-PAR ID:
10288226
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Applied Mathematics & Optimization
ISSN:
0095-4616
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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