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Title: Robust Long-Term Object Tracking via Improved Discriminative Model Prediction
We propose an improved discriminative model prediction method for robust long-term tracking based on a pre-trained short-term tracker. The baseline pre-trained short-term tracker is SuperDiMP which combines the bounding-box regressor of PrDiMP with the standard DiMP classifier. Our tracker RLT-DiMP improves SuperDiMP in the follow- ing three aspects: (1) Uncertainty reduction using random erasing: To make our model robust, we exploit an agreement from multiple im- ages after erasing random small rectangular areas as a certainty. And then, we correct the tracking state of our model accordingly. (2) Ran- dom search with spatio-temporal constraints: we propose a robust ran- dom search method with a score penalty applied to prevent the prob- lem of sudden detection at a distance. (3) Background augmentation for more discriminative feature learning: We augment various backgrounds that are not included in the search area to train a more robust model in the background clutter. In experiments on the VOT-LT2020 bench- mark dataset, the proposed method achieves comparable performance to the state-of-the-art long-term trackers. The source code is available at: https://github.com/bismex/RLT-DIMP.
Authors:
; ; ;
Editors:
Bartoli, A; Fusiello, A
Award ID(s):
1650994
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10289121
Journal Name:
Computer Vision – ECCV 2020 Workshops
Volume:
12539
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
602-617
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Using the offline decoder and postprocessor, the model performed at 36.23% sensitivity with 9.52 FAs per 24 hours. The trained model was then evaluated with the online modules. The current performance of the overall online system is 45.80% sensitivity with 28.14 FAs per 24 hours. Table 2 summarizes the performances of these systems. The performance of the online system deviates from the offline P1 model because the online postprocessor fails to combine the events as the seizure probability fluctuates during an event. The modules in the online system add a total of 11.1 seconds of delay for processing each second of the data, as shown in Figure 3. In practice, we also count the time for loading the model and starting the visualizer block. When we consider these facts, the system consumes 15 seconds to display the first hypothesis. The system detects seizure onsets with an average latency of 15 seconds. Implementing an automatic seizure detection model in real time is not trivial. We used a variety of techniques such as the file locking mechanism, multithreading, circular buffers, real-time event decoding, and signal-decision plotting to realize the system. A video demonstrating the system is available at: https://www.isip.piconepress.com/projects/nsf_pfi_tt/resources/videos/realtime_eeg_analysis/v2.5.1/video_2.5.1.mp4. The final conference submission will include a more detailed analysis of the online performance of each module. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Research reported in this publication was most recently supported by the National Science Foundation Partnership for Innovation award number IIP-1827565 and the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program (PA CURE). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official views of any of these organizations. REFERENCES [1] A. Craik, Y. He, and J. L. 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