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Title: How Teachers Support Student Computational Thinking Practices
Computational Thinking (CT) is increasingly being targeted as a pedagogical goal for science education. As such, researchers and teachers should collaborate to scaffold student engagement with CT alongside new technology and curricula. We interviewed two high school teachers who implemented a unit using dynamic modeling software to examine how they supported student engagement with CT through modeling practices. Based on their interviews, they believed that they supported student engagement in CT and modeling through preliminary activities, conducting classroom demonstrations of the phenomenon, and engaging students in model revisions through dialogue.
Authors:
; ;
Editors:
Gresalfi, M.; Horn, I. S.
Award ID(s):
1842035
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10289241
Journal Name:
How Teachers Support Student Computational Thinking Practices
Volume:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2343-2344
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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