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Title: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor mediates pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular remodeling induced by inhaled nicotine
Use of electronic cigarettes is rapidly increasing among youth and young adults, but little is known regarding the long-term cardiopulmonary health impacts of these nicotine-containing devices. Our group has previously demonstrated that chronic, inhaled nicotine induces pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) remodeling in mice. These changes were associated with upregulated RV angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) have been shown to reverse cigarette smoking-induced PH in rats. ACE inhibitor and ARB use in a large retrospective cohort of patients with PH is associated with improved survival. Here, we utilized losartan (an ARB specific for angiotensin II type 1 receptor) to further explore nicotine-induced PH. Male C57BL/6 mice received nicotine vapor for 12 h/day, and exposure was assessed using serum cotinine to achieve levels comparable to human smokers or electronic cigarette users. Mice were exposed to nicotine for 8 wk and a subset was treated with losartan via an osmotic minipump. Cardiac function was assessed using echocardiography and catheterization. Although nicotine exposure increased angiotensin II in the RV and lung, this finding was nonsignificant. Chronic, inhaled nicotine significantly increased RV systolic pressure and RV free wall thickness versus air control. These parameters were significantly lower in mice receiving both more » nicotine and losartan. Nicotine significantly increased RV internal diameter, with no differences seen between the nicotine and nicotine-losartan group. Neither nicotine nor losartan affected left ventricular structure or function. These findings provide the first evidence that antagonism of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can ameliorate chronic, inhaled nicotine-induced PH and RV remodeling. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Chronic, inhaled nicotine causes pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular remodeling in mice. Treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, ameliorates nicotine-induced pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular remodeling. This novel finding provides preclinical evidence for the use of renin-angiotensin system-based therapies in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, particularly in patients with a history of tobacco-product use. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1359140 1659752
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10290331
Journal Name:
American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume:
320
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
H1526 to H1534
ISSN:
0363-6135
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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