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Title: Performance Evaluation of ANCF Tetrahedral Elements in the Analysis of Liquid Sloshing
Abstract The performance of the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) tetrahedral element in the analysis of liquid sloshing is evaluated in this paper using a total Lagrangian nonincremental solution procedure. In this verification study, the results obtained using the ANCF tetrahedral element are compared with the results of the ANCF solid element which has been previously subjected to numerical verification and experimental validation. The tetrahedral-element model, which allows for arbitrarily large displacements including rotations, can be systematically integrated with computational multibody system (MBS) algorithms that allow for developing complex sloshing/vehicle models. The new fluid formulation allows for systematically increasing the degree of continuity in order to obtain higher degree of smoothness at the element interface, eliminate dependent variables, and reduce the model dimensionality. The effect of the fluid/container interaction is examined using a penalty contact approach. Simple benchmark problems and complex railroad vehicle sloshing scenarios are used to examine the performance of the ANCF tetrahedral element in solving liquid sloshing problems. The simulation results show that, unlike the ANCF solid element, the ANCF tetrahedral element model exhibits nonsmoothness of the free surface. This difference is attributed to the gradient discontinuity at the tetrahedral-element interface, use of different meshing rules for more » the solid- and tetrahedral-elements, and the interaction between elements. It is shown that applying curvature-continuity conditions leads, in general, to higher degree of smoothness. Nonetheless, a higher degree of continuity does not improve the solution accuracy when using the ANCF tetrahedral elements. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1632302
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10290993
Journal Name:
Journal of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification
Volume:
5
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2377-2158
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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