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Title: In-plane uniaxial pressure-induced out-of-plane antiferromagnetic moment and critical fluctuations in BaFe2As2
Abstract A small in-plane external uniaxial pressure has been widely used as an effective method to acquire single domain iron pnictide BaFe 2 As 2 , which exhibits twin-domains without uniaxial strain below the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (nematic) transition temperature T s . Although it is generally assumed that such a pressure will not affect the intrinsic electronic/magnetic properties of the system, it is known to enhance the antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering temperature T N ( <  T s ) and create in-plane resistivity anisotropy above T s . Here we use neutron polarization analysis to show that such a strain on BaFe 2 As 2 also induces a static or quasi-static out-of-plane ( c -axis) AF order and its associated critical spin fluctuations near T N / T s . Therefore, uniaxial pressure necessary to detwin single crystals of BaFe 2 As 2 actually rotates the easy axis of the collinear AF order near T N / T s , and such effects due to spin-orbit coupling must be taken into account to unveil the intrinsic electronic/magnetic properties of the system.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1700081
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10291293
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
11
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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