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Title: From professional development to pedagogy: An examination of computer science teachers’ culturally responsive instructional practices
The field of computer science continues to lack diverse representation from women and racially minoritized individuals. One way to address the discrepancies in representation is through systematic changes in computer science education from a young age. Pedagogical and instructional changes are needed to promote meaningful and equitable learning that engage students with rigorous and inclusive curricula. We developed an equity-focused professional development program for teachers that promotes culturally responsive pedagogy in the context of computer science education. This paper provides an overview of our culturally responsive frameworks and an examination of how teachers conceptualized and integrated culturally responsive pedagogy in their classrooms. Findings revealed that teachers were consistently planning to implement a wide range of culturally responsive instructional and pedagogical practices into their classrooms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1639649
NSF-PAR ID:
10291319
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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