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Title: From professional development to pedagogy: An examination of computer science teachers’ culturally responsive instructional practices
The field of computer science continues to lack diverse representation from women and racially minoritized individuals. One way to address the discrepancies in representation is through systematic changes in computer science education from a young age. Pedagogical and instructional changes are needed to promote meaningful and equitable learning that engages students with rigorous and inclusive curricula. We developed an equity-focused professional development program for teachers that promotes culturally responsive pedagogy in the context of computer science education. This study provides an overview of our culturally responsive framework and a qualitative examination of how teachers (n=9) conceptualized and applied culturally responsive pedagogy in their classrooms. Drawing from grounded theory and lesson assessment rubrics, we developed a codebook to analyze teacher interviews, lesson plans, and questionnaire responses. Findings revealed that, following their participation in professional development, teachers were consistently planning to implement a wide range of culturally responsive instructional and pedagogical practices capable of promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion in computer science education.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1649224
NSF-PAR ID:
10315325
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of technology and teacher education
Volume:
29
Issue:
4
ISSN:
1059-7069
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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