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Title: Resistance state evolution under constant electric stress on a MoS 2 non-volatile resistive switching device
MoS 2 has been reported to exhibit a resistive switching phenomenon in a vertical metal–insulator–metal (MIM) structure and has attracted much attention due to its ultra-thin active layer thickness. Here, the resistance evolutions in the high resistance state (HRS) and low resistance state (LRS) are investigated under constant voltage stress (CVS) or constant current stress (CCS) on MoS 2 resistive switching devices. Interestingly, compared with bulk transition metal oxides (TMO), MoS 2 exhibits an opposite characteristic in the fresh or pre-RESET device in the “HRS” wherein the resistance will increase to an even higher resistance after applying CVS, a unique phenomenon only accessible in 2D-based resistive switching devices. It is inferred that instead of in the highest resistance state, the fresh or pre-RESET devices are in an intermediate state with a small amount of Au embedded in the MoS 2 film. Inspired by the capability of both bipolar and unipolar operation, positive and negative CVS measurements are performed and show similar characteristics. In addition, it is observed that the resistance state transition is faster when using higher electric stress. Numerical simulations have been performed to study the temperature effect with small-area integration capability. These results can be explained by a more » modified conductive-bridge-like model based on Au migration, uncovering the switching mechanisms in the ultrathin 2D materials and inspiring future studies in this area. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1809017
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10291337
Journal Name:
RSC Advances
Volume:
10
Issue:
69
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
42249 to 42255
ISSN:
2046-2069
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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