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Title: Probing the black hole metric: Black hole shadows and binary black-hole inspirals
Award ID(s):
1743747
NSF-PAR ID:
10291482
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physical Review D
Volume:
103
Issue:
10
ISSN:
2470-0010
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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