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Title: The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein alters barrier function in 2D static and 3D microfluidic in-vitro models of the human blood–brain barrier
Award ID(s):
2034780
NSF-PAR ID:
10291832
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Neurobiology of Disease
Volume:
146
Issue:
C
ISSN:
0969-9961
Page Range / eLocation ID:
105131
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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