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Title: Mathematics instructors’ attention to instructional interactions in discussions of teaching rehearsals
In our project, we develop curricular materials to support prospective secondary teachers’ development of MKT and provide professional development (PD) opportunities for instructors ho will teach with these materials. In this paper, we examine the ways in which mathematics faculty engage in the teaching rehearsal debriefs included in the PD to answer the question: To what instructional interactions do instructors of mathematics content courses attend during rehearsal debriefs enacted in PD? Findings show that mathematics instructors attend to all types of interactions but attention is influenced by instructors’ mathematical knowledge.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1726723
NSF-PAR ID:
10291936
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Editor(s):
Sacristán, A.I.; Cortés-Zavala, J.C.; Ruiz-Arias, P.M.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Mathematics Education Across Cultures: Proceedings of the 42nd Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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