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Title: Crowdsourcing via Annotator Co-occurrence Imputation and Provable Symmetric Nonnegative Matrix Factorization
Unsupervised learning of the Dawid-Skene (D&S) model from noisy, incomplete and crowdsourced annotations has been a long-standing challenge, and is a critical step towards reliably labeling massive data. A recent work takes a coupled nonnegative matrix factorization (CNMF) perspective, and shows appealing features: It ensures the identifiability of the D&S model and enjoys low sample complexity, as only the estimates of the co-occurrences of annotator labels are involved. However, the identifiability holds only when certain somewhat restrictive conditions are met in the context of crowdsourcing. Optimizing the CNMF criterion is also costly—and convergence assurances are elusive. This work recasts the pairwise co-occurrence based D&S model learning problem as a symmetric NMF (SymNMF) problem—which offers enhanced identifiability relative to CNMF. In practice, the SymNMF model is often (largely) incomplete, due to the lack of co-labeled items by some annotators. Two lightweight algorithms are proposed for co-occurrence imputation. Then, a low-complexity shifted rectified linear unit (ReLU)-empowered SymNMF algorithm is proposed to identify the D&S model. Various performance characterizations (e.g., missing co-occurrence recoverability, stability, and convergence) and evaluations are also presented.
Authors:
;
Editors:
Meila, Marina; Zhang, Tong
Award ID(s):
2007836
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10292988
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Machine Learning
Volume:
139
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4544-4554
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official views of any of these organizations. REFERENCES [1] I. Obeid and J. Picone, “The Temple University Hospital EEG Data Corpus,” in Augmentation of Brain Function: Facts, Fiction and Controversy. Volume I: Brain-Machine Interfaces, 1st ed., vol. 10, M. A. Lebedev, Ed. Lausanne, Switzerland: Frontiers Media S.A., 2016, pp. 394 398. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2016.00196. [2] V. Shah et al., “The Temple University Hospital Seizure Detection Corpus,” Frontiers in Neuroinformatics, vol. 12, pp. 1–6, 2018. https://doi.org/10.3389/fninf.2018.00083. [3] A. Hamid et, al., “The Temple University Artifact Corpus: An Annotated Corpus of EEG Artifacts.” in Proceedings of the IEEE Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology Symposium (SPMB), 2020, pp. 1-3. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/9353647. [4] Y. Roy, R. Iskander, and J. Picone, “The NeurekaTM 2020 Epilepsy Challenge,” NeuroTechX, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://neureka-challenge.com/. [Accessed: 01-Dec-2021]. [5] S. Rahman, A. Hamid, D. Ochal, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “Improving the Quality of the TUSZ Corpus,” in Proceedings of the IEEE Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology Symposium (SPMB), 2020, pp. 1–5. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/9353635. [6] V. Shah, E. von Weltin, T. Ahsan, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “On the Use of Non-Experts for Generation of High-Quality Annotations of Seizure Events,” Available: https://www.isip.picone press.com/publications/unpublished/journals/2019/elsevier_cn/ira. [Accessed: 01-Dec-2021]. [7] D. Ochal, S. Rahman, S. Ferrell, T. Elseify, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “The Temple University Hospital EEG Corpus: Annotation Guidelines,” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 2020. https://www.isip.piconepress.com/publications/reports/2020/tuh_eeg/annotations/. [8] D. 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