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Title: Abstraction and subsumption in modular verification of C programs
The type-theoretic notions of existential abstraction, subtyping, subsumption, and intersection have useful analogues in separation-logic proofs of imperative programs. We have implemented these as an enhancement of the verified software toolchain (VST). VST is an impredicative concurrent separation logic for the C language, implemented in the Coq proof assistant, and proved sound in Coq. For machine-checked functional-correctness verification of software at scale, VST embeds its expressive program logic in dependently typed higher-order logic (CiC). Specifications and proofs in the program logic can leverage the expressiveness of CiCโ€”so users can overcome the abstraction gaps that stand in the way of top-to-bottom verification: gaps between source code verification, compilation, and domain-specific reasoning, and between different analysis techniques or formalisms. Until now, VST has supported the specification of a program as a flat collection of function specifications (in higher-order separation logic)โ€”one proves that each function correctly implements its specification, assuming the specifications of the functions it calls. But what if a function has more than one specification? In this work, we exploit type-theoretic concepts to structure specification interfaces for C code. This brings modularity principles of modern software engineering to concrete program verification. Previous work used representation predicates to enable data abstraction in more » separation logic. We go further, introducing function-specification subsumption and intersection specifications to organize the multiple specifications that a function is typically associated with. As in type theory, if ๐œ™ is a of ๐œ“, that is ๐œ™<:๐œ“, then ๐‘ฅ:๐œ™ implies ๐‘ฅ:๐œ“, meaning that any function satisfying specification ๐œ™ can be used wherever a function satisfying ๐œ“ is demanded. Subsumption incorporates separation-logic framing and parameter adaptation, as well as step-indexing and specifications constructed via mixed-variance functors (needed for Cโ€™s function pointers). « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1811894
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10294156
Journal Name:
Formal Methods in System Design
ISSN:
0925-9856
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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