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Title: Learning A Wafer Feature With One Training Sample
In this work, we consider learning a wafer plot recognizer where only one training sample is available. We introduce an approach called Manifestation Learning to enable the learning. The underlying technology utilizes the Variational AutoEncoder (VAE) approach to construct a so-called Manifestation Space. The training sample is projected into this space and the recognition is achieved through a pre-trained model in the space. Using wafer probe test data from an automotive product line, this paper explains the learning approach, its feasibility and limitation.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2006739
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10295363
Journal Name:
2020 IEEE International Test Conference (ITC)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 10
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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