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Title: Optimal Vertex Fault-Tolerant Spanners in Polynomial Time
Recent work has pinned down the existentially optimal size bounds for vertex fault-tolerant spanners: for any positive integer k, every n-node graph has a (2k – 1)-spanner on O(f^{1–1/k} n^{1+1/k}) edges resilient to f vertex faults, and there are examples of input graphs on which this bound cannot be improved. However, these proofs work by analyzing the output spanner of a certain exponential-time greedy algorithm. In this work, we give the first algorithm that produces vertex fault tolerant spanners of optimal size and which runs in polynomial time. Specifically, we give a randomized algorithm which takes Õ(f^{1–1/k} n^{2+1/k} + mf2) time. We also derandomize our algorithm to give a deterministic algorithm with similar bounds. This reflects an exponential improvement in runtime over [Bodwin-Patel PODC '19], the only previously known algorithm for constructing optimal vertex fault-tolerant spanners.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1909111
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10295389
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2021 ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2924--2938
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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