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Title: The 2021 Room-Temperature Superconductivity Roadmap
Last year, the report of Room-Temperature Superconductivity in high-pressure carbonaceous sulfur hydride marked a major milestone in the history of physics: one of the holy grails of condensed matter research was reached after more than one century of continuing efforts. This long path started with Neil Ashcroft’s and Vitaly Ginzburg’s visionary insights on high-temperature superconductivity in metallic hydrogen in the 60’s and 70’s, and has led to the current hydride fever, following the report of high-Tc high-pressure superconductivity in H3S in 2014. This Roadmap collects selected contributions from many of the main actors in this exciting chapter of condensed matter history. Key for the rapid progress of this field has been a new course for materials discovery, where experimental and theoretical discoveries proceed hand in hand. The aim of this Roadmap is not only to offer a snapshot of the current status of superconductor materials research, but also to define the theoretical and experimental obstacles that must be overcome for us to realize fully exploitable room temperature superconductors, and foresee future strategies and research directions. This means improving synthesis techniques, extending first-principles methods for superconductors and structural search algorithms for crystal structure predictions, but also identifying new approaches to material more » discovery based on artificial intelligence. « less
Authors:
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Editors:
Boeri, L.; Hennig, R.; Hirschfeld, P.; Profeta, G.; Sanna, A.; Zurek, E.
Award ID(s):
1933622
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10295404
Journal Name:
Journal of physics
ISSN:
0953-8984
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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