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This content will become publicly available on August 1, 2022

Title: Deep Descriptive Clustering
Recent work on explainable clustering allows describing clusters when the features are interpretable. However, much modern machine learning focuses on complex data such as images, text, and graphs where deep learning is used but the raw features of data are not interpretable. This paper explores a novel setting for performing clustering on complex data while simultaneously generating explanations using interpretable tags. We propose deep descriptive clustering that performs sub-symbolic representation learning on complex data while generating explanations based on symbolic data. We form good clusters by maximizing the mutual information between empirical distribution on the inputs and the induced clustering labels for clustering objectives. We generate explanations by solving an integer linear programming that generates concise and orthogonal descriptions for each cluster. Finally, we allow the explanation to inform better clustering by proposing a novel pairwise loss with self-generated constraints to maximize the clustering and explanation module's consistency. Experimental results on public data demonstrate that our model outperforms competitive baselines in clustering performance while offering high-quality cluster-level explanations.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1910306
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10296724
Journal Name:
IJCAI
ISSN:
1045-0823
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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