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Title: Abolitionist Computer Science Teaching: Moving from Access to Justice.
As high school computer science course offerings have expanded over the past decade, gaps in race and gender have remained. This study embraces the “All” in the “CS for All” movement by shifting beyond access and toward abolitionist computer science teaching. Using data from professional development observations and interviews, we lift the voices of BIPOC CS teachers and bring together tenets put forth by Love (2019) for abolitionist teaching along with how these tenets map onto the work occurring in CS classrooms. Our findings indicate the importance of BIPOC teacher representation in CS classrooms and ways abolitionist teaching tenets can inform educator’s efforts at moving beyond broadening participation and toward radical inclusion, educational freedom, and self-determination, for ALL.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1837394
NSF-PAR ID:
10297381
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of Research in Equity and Sustained Participation in Computing (RESPECT)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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