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Title: Coherence across conceptual and computational representations of students’ scientific models
We articulate a framework for characterizing student learning trajectories as they progress through a scientific modeling curriculum. By maintaining coherence between modeling representations and leveraging key design principles including evidence-centered design, we develop mechanisms to evaluate student science and computational thinking (CT) proficiency as they transition from conceptual to computational modeling representations. We have analyzed pre-post assessments and learning artifacts from 99 6th grade students and present three contrasting vignettes to illustrate students’ learning trajectories as they work on their modeling tasks. Our analysis indicates pathways that support the transition and identify domain-specific support needs. Our findings will inform refinements to our curriculum and scaffolding of students to further support the integrated learning of science and CT.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
de Vries, E.
Award ID(s):
2017000
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10298751
Journal Name:
Computersupported collaborative learning
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
330-337
ISSN:
1573-4552
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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