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Title: Studying the Interactions Between Science, Engineering, and Computational Thinking in a Learning-by-Modeling Environment.
Computational Thinking (CT) can play a central role in fostering students' integrated learning of science and engineering. We adopt this framework to design and develop the Water Runoff Challenge (WRC) curriculum for lower middle school students in the USA. This paper presents (1) the WRC curriculum implemented in an integrated computational modeling and engineering design environment and (2) formative and summative assessments used to evaluate learner’s science, engineering, and CT skills as they progress through the curriculum. We derived a series of performance measures associated with student learning from system log data and the assessments. By applying Path Analysis we found significant relations between measures of science, engineering, and CT learning, indicating that they are mutually supportive of learning across these disciplines.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1742195
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10184051
Journal Name:
In: Bittencourt I., Cukurova M., Muldner K., Luckin R., Millán E. (eds) Artificial Intelligence in Education. AIED 2020. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.
Volume:
12163
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
598-609
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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