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Title: Promoting computational thinking through project-based learning
Abstract

This paper introduces project-based learning (PBL) features for developing technological, curricular, and pedagogical supports to engage students in computational thinking (CT) through modeling. CT is recognized as the collection of approaches that  involve people in computational problem solving. CT supports students in deconstructing and reformulating a phenomenon such that it can be resolved using an information-processing agent (human or machine) to reach a scientifically appropriate explanation of a phenomenon. PBL allows students to learn by doing, to apply ideas, figure out how phenomena occur and solve challenging, compelling and complex problems. In doing so, students  take part in authentic science practices similar to those of professionals in science or engineering, such as computational thinking. This paper includes 1) CT and its associated aspects, 2) The foundation of PBL, 3) PBL design features to support CT through modeling, and 4) a curriculum example and associated student models to illustrate how particular design features can be used for developing high school physical science materials, such as an evaporative cooling unit to promote the teaching and learning of CT.

Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1842035
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10282760
Journal Name:
Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Science Education Research
Volume:
3
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2662-2300
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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