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This content will become publicly available on July 1, 2022

Title: Novel Computational Linguistic Measures, Dialogue System and the Development of SOPHIE: Standardized Online Patient for Healthcare Interaction Education
In this paper, we describe the iterative participatory design of SOPHIE, an online virtual patient for feedback-based practice of sensitive patient-physician conversations, and discuss an initial qualitative evaluation of the system by professional end users. The design of SOPHIE was motivated from a computational linguistic analysis of the transcripts of 383 patient-physician conversations from an essential office visit of late stage cancer patients with their oncologists. We developed methods for the automatic detection of two behavioral paradigms, lecturing and positive language usage patterns (sentiment trajectory of conversation), that are shown to be significantly associated with patient prognosis understanding. These automated metrics associated with effective communication were incorporated into SOPHIE, and a pilot user study identified that SOPHIE was favorably reviewed by a user group of practicing physicians.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1940981
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10299982
Journal Name:
IEEE transactions on affective computing
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-16
ISSN:
2371-9850
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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