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Title: Non-reciprocal acoustics in a viscous environment
It is demonstrated that acoustic transmission through a phononic crystal with anisotropic solid scatterers becomes non-reciprocal if the background fluid is viscous. In an ideal (inviscid) fluid, the transmission along the direction of broken P symmetry is asymmetric. This asymmetry is compatible with reciprocity since time-reversal symmetry ( T symmetry) holds. Viscous losses break T symmetry, adding a non-reciprocal contribution to the transmission coefficient. The non-reciprocal transmission spectra for a phononic crystal of metallic circular cylinders in water are experimentally obtained and analysed. The surfaces of the cylinders were specially processed in order to weakly break P symmetry and increase viscous losses through manipulation of surface features. Subsequently, the non-reciprocal part of transmission is separated from its asymmetric reciprocal part in numerically simulated transmission spectra. The level of non-reciprocity is in agreement with the measure of broken P symmetry. The reported study contradicts commonly accepted opinion that linear dissipation cannot be a reason leading to non-reciprocity. It also opens a way for engineering passive acoustic diodes exploring the natural viscosity of any fluid as a factor leading to non-reciprocity.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1741677
NSF-PAR ID:
10300046
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume:
476
Issue:
2244
ISSN:
1364-5021
Page Range / eLocation ID:
20200657
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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