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Title: Effect of Laser Forming on the Energy Absorbing Behavior of Metal Foams
Abstract Metal foam is light in weight and exhibits an excellent impact-absorbing capability. Laser forming has emerged as a promising process in shaping metal foam plates into desired geometry. While the feasibility and shaping mechanism has been studied, the effect of the laser forming process on the mechanical properties and the energy-absorbing behavior in particular of the formed foam parts has not been well understood. This study comparatively investigated such effect on as-received and laser-formed closed-cell aluminum alloy foam. In quasi-static compression tests, attention paid to the changes in the elastic region. Imperfections near the laser-irradiated surface were closely examined and used to help elucidate the similarities and differences in as-received and laser-formed specimens. Similarly, from the impact tests, differences in deformation and specific energy absorption were focused on, while relative density distribution and evolution of foam specimens were numerically investigated.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1725980
NSF-PAR ID:
10301254
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering
Volume:
144
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1087-1357
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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