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Title: Marine Polymer-Gels’ Relevance in the Atmosphere as Aerosols and CCN
Marine polymer gels play a critical role in regulating ocean basin scale biogeochemical dynamics. This brief review introduces the crucial role of marine gels as a source of aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in cloud formation processes, emphasizing Arctic marine microgels. We review the gel’s composition and relation to aerosols, their emergent properties, and physico-chemical processes that explain their change in size spectra, specifically in relation to aerosols and CCN. Understanding organic aerosols and CCN in this context provides clear benefits to quantifying the role of marine nanogel/microgel in microphysical processes leading to cloud formation. This review emphasizes the DOC-marine gel/aerosolized gel-cloud link, critical to developing accurate climate models.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1634009
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10301854
Journal Name:
Gels
Volume:
7
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
185
ISSN:
2310-2861
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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