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Title: Considerations for Designing Private and Inexpensive Smart Cities
The expectation of people and futurists is that all respectable cities will become Smart Cities in the near future. Two main barriers stand in the way of the evolution of cities. First is cost, the transformation into a smart city is expensive (e.g., between $30 Million and $40 Billion) and only a few cities are able to obtain the resources required for upgrades. Second, many citizens equate the data collection and surveillance of smart city technology with aggressive infringements on privacy. In this paper, we describe how citizens, city planners, and companies can develop smart cities that do not require crippling loans and are respectful of privacy.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1952181
NSF-PAR ID:
10301998
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IARIA The Sixteenth International Conference on Wireless and Mobile Communications (ICWMC 2020)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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