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Title: Characterizing Variability in Shared Meaning through Millions of Sketches
The study of mental representations of concepts has histori- cally focused on the representations of the “average” person. Here, we shift away from this aggregate view and examine the principles of variability across people in conceptual rep- resentations. Using a database of millions of sketches by peo- ple worldwide, we ask what predicts whether people converge or diverge in their representations of a specific concept, and which kinds of concepts tend to be more or less variable. We find that larger and more dense populations tend to have less variable representations, and concepts high in valence and arousal tend to be less variable across people. Further, two countries tend to have people with more similar conceptual representations when they are linguistically, geographically, and culturally similar. Our work provides the first characteri- zation of the principles of variability in shared meaning across a large, diverse sample of participants.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2020969
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10302201
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1970-1976
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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