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Title: Dynamic Grasping with Reachability and Motion Awareness
Grasping in dynamic environments presents a unique set of challenges. A stable and reachable grasp can become unreachable and unstable as the target object moves, motion planning needs to be adaptive and in real time, the delay in computation makes prediction necessary. In this paper, we present a dynamic grasping framework that is reachabilityaware and motion-aware. Specifically, we model the reachability space of the robot using a signed distance field which enables us to quickly screen unreachable grasps. Also, we train a neural network to predict the grasp quality conditioned on the current motion of the target. Using these as ranking functions, we quickly filter a large grasp database to a few grasps in real time. In addition, we present a seeding approach for arm motion generation that utilizes solution from previous time step. This quickly generates a new arm trajectory that is close to the previous plan and prevents fluctuation. We implement a recurrent neural network (RNN) for modelling and predicting the object motion. Our extensive experiments demonstrate the importance of each of these components and we validate our pipeline on a real robot.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1734557
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10302690
Journal Name:
iros
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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