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Title: Coherent control of asymmetric spintronic terahertz emission from two-dimensional hybrid metal halides
Abstract

Next-generation terahertz (THz) sources demand lightweight, low-cost, defect-tolerant, and robust components with synergistic, tunable capabilities. However, a paucity of materials systems simultaneously possessing these desirable attributes and functionalities has made device realization difficult. Here we report the observation of asymmetric spintronic-THz radiation in Two-Dimensional Hybrid Metal Halides (2D-HMH) interfaced with a ferromagnetic metal, produced by ultrafast spin current under femtosecond laser excitation. The generated THz radiation exhibits an asymmetric intensity toward forward and backward emission direction whose directionality can be mutually controlled by the direction of applied magnetic field and linear polarization of the laser pulse. Our work demonstrates the capability for the coherent control of THz emission from 2D-HMHs, enabling their promising applications on the ultrafast timescale as solution-processed material candidates for future THz emitters.

Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1933297 1933301
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10304835
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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