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Title: Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Near Detector Conceptual Design Report
The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international, world-class experiment aimed at exploring fundamental questions about the universe that are at the forefront of astrophysics and particle physics research. DUNE will study questions pertaining to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of supernovae, the subtleties of neutrino interaction physics, and a number of beyond the Standard Model topics accessible in a powerful neutrino beam. A critical component of the DUNE physics program involves the study of changes in a powerful beam of neutrinos, i.e., neutrino oscillations, as the neutrinos propagate a long distance. The experiment consists of a near detector, sited close to the source of the beam, and a far detector, sited along the beam at a large distance. This document, the DUNE Near Detector Conceptual Design Report (CDR), describes the design of the DUNE near detector and the science program that drives the design and technology choices. The goals and requirements underlying the design, along with projected performance are given. It serves as a starting point for a more detailed design that will be described in future documents.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2047665 2013217 1913983 2111053 1806600 1806849
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10312363
Journal Name:
Instruments
Volume:
5
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2410-390X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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