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Title: Inertial-range Magnetic-fluctuation Anisotropy Observed from Parker Solar Probe’s First Seven Orbits
Solar wind turbulence is anisotropic with respect to the mean magnetic field. Anisotropy leads to ambiguity when interpreting in situ turbulence observations in the solar wind because an apparent change in the measurements could be due to either the change of intrinsic turbulence properties or to a simple change of the spacecraft sampling direction. We demonstrate the ambiguity using the spectral index and magnetic compressibility in the inertial range observed by the Parker Solar Probe during its first seven orbits ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 au. To unravel the effects of the sampling direction, we assess whether the wave-vector anisotropy is consistent with a two-dimensional (2D) plus slab turbulence transport model and determine the fraction of power in the 2D versus slab component. Our results confirm that the 2D plus slab model is consistent with the data and the power ratio between 2D and slab components depends on radial distance, with the relative power in 2D fluctuations becoming smaller closer to the Sun.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1655280
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10312699
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical journal
Volume:
924
Issue:
L5
ISSN:
1538-4365
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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