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This content will become publicly available on November 12, 2022

Title: Discovery of davemaoite, CaSiO 3 -perovskite, as a mineral from the lower mantle
Calcium silicate perovskite, CaSiO 3 , is arguably the most geochemically important phase in the lower mantle, because it concentrates elements that are incompatible in the upper mantle, including the heat-generating elements thorium and uranium, which have half-lives longer than the geologic history of Earth. We report CaSiO 3 -perovskite as an approved mineral (IMA2020-012a) with the name davemaoite. The natural specimen of davemaoite proves the existence of compositional heterogeneity within the lower mantle. Our observations indicate that davemaoite also hosts potassium in addition to uranium and thorium in its structure. Hence, the regional and global abundances of davemaoite influence the heat budget of the deep mantle, where the mineral is thermodynamically stable.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1942042
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10313261
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
374
Issue:
6569
ISSN:
0036-8075
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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