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Title: Detecting spatially co-expressed gene clusters with functional coherence by graph-regularized convolutional neural network
Abstract Motivation Clustering spatial-resolved gene expression is an essential analysis to reveal gene activities in the underlying morphological context by their functional roles. However, conventional clustering analysis does not consider gene expression co-localizations in tissue for detecting spatial expression patterns or functional relationships among the genes for biological interpretation in the spatial context. In this article, we present a convolutional neural network (CNN) regularized by the graph of protein–protein interaction (PPI) network to cluster spatially resolved gene expression. This method improves the coherence of spatial patterns and provides biological interpretation of the gene clusters in the spatial context by exploiting the spatial localization by convolution and gene functional relationships by graph-Laplacian regularization. Results In this study, we tested clustering the spatially variable genes or all expressed genes in the transcriptome in 22 Visium spatial transcriptomics datasets of different tissue sections publicly available from 10× Genomics and spatialLIBD. The results demonstrate that the PPI-regularized CNN constantly detects gene clusters with coherent spatial patterns and significantly enriched by gene functions with the state-of-the-art performance. Additional case studies on mouse kidney tissue and human breast cancer tissue suggest that the PPI-regularized CNN also detects spatially co-expressed genes to define the corresponding morphological context in the tissue with valuable insights. Availability and implementation Source code is available at https://github.com/kuanglab/CNN-PReg. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2042159
NSF-PAR ID:
10315922
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Martelli, Pier Luigi
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Bioinformatics
Volume:
38
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1367-4803
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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