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Title: Permissioned Blockchains: Properties, Techniques and Applications
The unique features of blockchains such as immutability, transparency, provenance, and authenticity have been used by many large-scale data management systems to deploy a wide range of distributed applications including supply chain management, healthcare, and crowdworking in permissioned settings. Unlike permissionless settings, e.g., Bitcoin, where the network is public, and anyone can participate without a specific identity, a permissioned blockchain system consists of a set of known, identified nodes that might not fully trust each other. While the characteristics of permissioned blockchains are appealing to a wide range of largescale data management systems, these systems, have to satisfy four main requirements: confidentiality, verifiability, performance, and scalability. Various approaches have been developed in industry and academia to satisfy these requirements with varying assumptions and costs. The focus of this tutorial is on presenting many of these techniques while highlighting the trade-offs among them. We demonstrate the practicality of such techniques in real-life by presenting three different applications, i.e., supply chain management, large-scale databases, and multi-platform crowdworking environments, and show how those techniques can be utilized to meet the requirements of such applications  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1815733 1703560
NSF-PAR ID:
10316016
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
SIGMOD'2021
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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