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Title: Multiple Element Limitation in Northern Hardwood Experiment (MELNHE): Soil respiration at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Bartlett Experimental Forest and Jeffers Brook, central NH USA, 2008 - present
Abstract Soil respiration in 15 stands across 3 sites within the White Mountain National Forest was measured between 2008 and 2020. Stands included in the dataset are part of the Multiple Element in Northern Hardwood Ecosystems (MELNHE) study, a full-factorial NxP fertilization experiment. Pre- and post-treatment data are included, with treatment beginning in 2011. Soil temperature, soil moisture, and relative air humidity at the time of measurement were also recorded next to or above the soil respiration collar at the time of the soil respiration measurement. Having been cut between 1883 and 1990, stands are representative of different successional stages.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1637685
NSF-PAR ID:
10317021
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Environmental Data Initiative
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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