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Title: Beyond Engineering: A Networked Improvement Community Combining STEM Equity and Access With Engineering Content Knowledge
Award ID(s):
1850398
NSF-PAR ID:
10317262
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
American Education Research Association (AERA) Annual Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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