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Title: Evaluating Students' Perceptions of Online Learning with 2-D Virtual Spaces
The COVID-19 pandemic led the majority of educational institutions to rapidly shift to primarily conducting courses through online, remote delivery. Across different institutions, the tools used for synchronous online course delivery varied. They included traditional video conferencing tools like Zoom, Google Meet, and WebEx as well as non-traditional tools like Gather.Town, Gatherly, and YoTribe. The main distinguishing characteristic of these nontraditional tools is their utilization of 2-D maps to create virtual meeting spaces that mimic real-world spaces. In this work, we aim to explore how such tools are perceived by students in the context of learning. Our intuition is that utilizing a tool that features a 2-D virtual space that resembles a real world classroom has underlying benefits compared to the more traditional video conferencing tools. The results of our study indicate that students' perception of using a 2-D virtual classroom improved their interaction, collaboration and overall satisfaction with an online learning experience.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1757884
NSF-PAR ID:
10319110
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
SIGCSE 2022: Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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