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Title: Tropical Precipitation Evolution in a Buoyancy-Budget Framework
Abstract Observations have shown that tropical convection is influenced by fluctuations in temperature and moisture in the lower free troposphere (LFT; 600–850 hPa), as well as moist enthalpy (ME) fluctuations beneath the 850 hPa level, referred to as the deep boundary layer (DBL; 850–1000 hPa). A framework is developed that consolidates these three quantities within the context of the buoyancy of an entraining plume. A “plume buoyancy equation” is derived based on a relaxed version of the weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation. Analysis of this equation using quantities derived from the Dynamics of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) sounding array data reveals that processes occurring within the DBL and the LFT contribute nearly equally to the evolution of plume buoyancy, indicating that processes that occur in both layers are critical to the evolution of tropical convection. Adiabatic motions play an important role in the evolution of buoyancy both at the daily and longer time scales and are comparable in magnitude to horizontal moisture advection and vertical moist static energy advection by convection. The plume buoyancy equation may explain convective coupling at short time scales in both temperature and moisture fluctuations and can be used to complement the commonly used moist static more » energy budget, which emphasizes the slower evolution of the convective envelope in tropical motion systems. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1936810
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10319679
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume:
78
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0022-4928
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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