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Title: A Laser Frequency Transverse Modulation Might Compensate for the Spectral Broadening Due to Large Electron Energy Spread in Thomson Sources
Compact laser plasma accelerators generate high-energy electron beams with increasing quality. When used in inverse Compton backscattering, however, the relatively large electron energy spread jeopardizes potential applications requiring small bandwidths. We present here a novel interaction scheme that allows us to compensate for the negative effects of the electron energy spread on the spectrum, by introducing a transverse spatial frequency modulation in the laser pulse. Such a laser chirp, together with a properly dispersed electron beam, can substantially reduce the broadening of the Compton bandwidth due to the electron energy spread. We show theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for hard X-ray Thomson sources based on laser plasma accelerators.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1847771
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10320232
Journal Name:
Photonics
Volume:
9
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2304-6732
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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