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Title: A Geometric Approach to Inelastic Collapse
We show how to interpret logarithmic spiral tilings as one-dimensional particle systems undergoing inelastic collapse. By deforming the spirals appropriately, we can simulate collisions among particles with distinct or varying coefficients of restitution. Our geometric constructions provide a strikingly simple illustration of a widely studied phenomenon in the physics of dissipative gases: the collapse of inelastic particles.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2006125
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10320712
Journal Name:
37th European Workshop on Computational Geometry (EuroCG)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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